Wednesday, 16 July 2014

June 2014 overview

Groundwater levels, June 2014
Groundwater levels normally fall in the summer months.  Recharge is limited as most of the rain that falls is captured by dry soils and used by growing plants. Groundwater drains naturally from aquifers towards rivers
and the sea.  During these months, there is more water leaving the aquifers than replenishing them, so we see water levels fall.  This falling section of a groundwater hydrograph is called the recession.

Hydrographs in most wells are showing the summer recession.  For example, in the Chalk aquifer at Little Bucket Farm, and in the Permo-Triassic Sandstones at Bussels No. 7a.
Falling groundwater levels in the Chalk at Little Bucket Farm (Kent)

Heavy rainfall in some areas in May was enough to interrupt the recession, so we see the hydrograph curving upwards, e.g. in the Lincolnshire Limestone at New Red Lion.
Interrupted recession in the Lincolnshire Limestone
at New Red Lion (east of Grantham, Lincolnshire)

Levels in some areas remain exceptionally high for the time of year, due to the exceptional spring rainfall, even though they are falling.  This is the case in the Permo-Triassic Sandstone aquifers of the north west (e.g. Skirwith) and the south west (e.g. Bussels No. 7a).

For more information, see the Hydrological Summary for June 2014 [PDF].

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